Recent Collaborative Publication

 

Simultaneous outbreaks of respiratory disease in wild chimpanzees caused by distinct viruses of human origin

Jacob D. Negrey, Rachna B. Reddy, Erik J. Scully, Sarah Phillips-Garcia, Leah A. Owens, Kevin Langergraber, John C. Mitani, Melissa Emery Thompson, Richard W. Wrangham, Martin N. Muller, Emily Otali, Zarin Machanda, David Hyeroba, Kristine A. Grindle, Tressa E. Pappas, Ann C. Palmenberg, James E. Gern, Tony L. Goldberg

Emerg Microbes Infect. 2019;8(1):139-149.

doi: 10.1080/22221751.2018.1563456.

Energetic Trade-offs between Reproduction and Immunological Health in Female Primates

 

Female primates bear a considerable burden in reproduction, spending substantial portions of their lifespan in energetically taxing stages of gestation and lactation. Energy allocation to producing and caring for infants is predicted to generate costs for the long-term health and survival of a female. But, studies of historical and contemporary human populations have not been able to establish firm evidence for trade-offs between reproduction and maternal condition, and closely related ape species, like chimpanzees, remain unexplored. Data from chimpanzees offer great potential to inform our understanding of evolutionary processes shaping longevity and post-reproductive lifespan in humans. By using a combination of demographic, hormonal, genetic, and infectious disease markers, this study offers novel data on age-associated patterns of disease in non-human primates, and potentially targets those factors salient to the evolution of extended lifespan in humans.

Past Research Projects:

 

Analysis of global gene identity reveals a history of serial founder effects and admixture with archaic humans 
(2009-2014)

Landscape Genetics of Schistosoma mansoni and it's Invertebrate Snail Host, Biomphalaria glabrata 
(2002-2004)

Phylogenetics of lymnaeid snails with emphasis on the evolution of susceptibility to Fascioloides magna infection 
(2000-2002)

Effects of Aquashade™  and CuSO4 on growth and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata 
(1999-2000)

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